Name: Dr Dmitry Kishkinev
Position: Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow
Email: d.kishkinev (at) bangor.ac.uk
Address: School of Natural Sciences, Bangor University,
Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 2UW, UK
Phone (office): +44 (0) 1248 38 8636

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  • Research interests:

    My research focuses on the role of different sensory systems required for animal navigation. Specifically, I address the questions how magnetic and olfactory senses help animals finding their geographic position relative to their (e.g. migratory) destination and how the animal magnetic sense works. For the latter I study the avian magnetic sense but plan to extend a list of model species to include some fish and insect species.

    My current Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship project based at Bangor University (UK) aims to further study a recently discovered disturbing effect of anthropogenic electromagnetic fields on the avian magnetic compass sense (see below).

    My main model systems are both migratory songbirds and homing pigeons. I am now working towards establishing an international and interdisciplinary consortium of researchers to make a significant progress in demystifying the animal magnetic sense through extending model systems (include migratory butterflies and fish species besides historically popular birds) and make use of state-of-the-art research methods.

    I am also enthusiastic in development and application of advanced telemetry and bio-logging techniques for movement ecology and bird navigation. For my Russian Science Foundation grant (see below), we deploy and use an array of automated radio-tracking towers constantly covering movements of birds in a study area. We are building a part of the MOTUS system in Europe (see more about MOTUS here https://motus.org, the map of European radio receivers is here). We recently deployed Vildehaye radio tower at Rybachy. Vildehaye is the result of the ATLAS project for high-throughput wildlife radio-tracking system developed by Minerva Centre for Movement Ecology (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel). I also have also used light-level geologgers for great reed warblers tracking, and I am now using GPS tracking for homing pigeons.

    I would be happy to consider any suggestions for collaboration.

    Selected Publications:


    A. Mukhin, D. Kobylkov, D. Kishkinev, V. Grinkevich (2018)
    Interrupted breeding in a songbird migrant triggers development of nocturnal locomotor activity
    Scientific reports 8 (1):5520.

    N. Chernetsov, A. Pakhomov, D. Kobylkov, D. Kishkinev, R. Holland, H. Mouritsen (2017)
    Migratory Eurasian reed warblers can use magnetic declination to solve the longitude problem
    Current Biology 27 (17):2647-2651. e2.

    D. Kishkinev, D. Heyers, B.K. Woodworth, G.W. Mitchell, A.H. Keith, D.R. Norris (2016)
    Experienced migratory songbirds do not display goal-ward orientation after release following a cross-continental displacement: an automated telemetry study
    Scientific Reports 6 (37326):NA.

    D. Kishkinev (2015)
    Sensory mechanisms of long-distance navigation in birds: a recent advance in the context of previous studies
    Journal of Ornithology 156 (1):145-161.

    D. Kishkinev, N. Chernetsov (2015)
    Magnetoreception systems in birds: a review of current research
    Biology Bulletin Reviews 5 (1):46-62.

    D. Kishkinev, N. Chernetsov, A. Pakhomov, D. Heyers, H. Mouritsen (2015)
    Eurasian reed warblers compensate for virtual magnetic displacement
    Current Biology 25 (19):R822-R824.

    D. Kishkinev, N. Chernetsov, D. Heyers, H. Mouritsen (2013)
    Migratory reed warblers need intact trigeminal nerves to correct for a 1,000 km eastward displacement
    PLoS One 8 (6):e65847.

    D. Kishkinev, H. Mouritsen, C.V. Mora (2012)
    An attempt to develop an operant conditioning paradigm to test for magnetic discrimination behavior in a migratory songbird
    Journal of Ornithology 153 (4):1165-1177.

    C.M. Hein, S. Engels, D. Kishkinev, H. Mouritsen (2011)
    Robins have a magnetic compass in both eyes
    Nature 471 (7340):E1.

    N. Chernetsov, D. Kishkinev, V. Kosarev, C.V. Bolshakov (2011)
    Not all songbirds calibrate their magnetic compass from twilight cues: a telemetry study
    Journal of Experimental Biology 214 (15):2540-2543.

    D. Kishkinev, N. Chernetsov, H. Mouritsen (2010)
    A Double-Clock or Jetlag Mechanism is Unlikely to be Involved in Detection of EastóWest Displacements in a Long-Distance Avian Migrant
    The Auk 127 (4):773-780.

    M. Zapka, D. Heyers, C.M. Hein, S. Engels, N. Schneider, J. Hans, S. Weiler, D. Dreyer, D. Kishkinev, J.M. Wild (2009)
    Visual but not trigeminal mediation of magnetic compass information in a migratory bird
    Nature 461 (7268):1274.

    N. Chernetsov, D. Kishkinev, H. Mouritsen (2008)
    A long-distance avian migrant compensates for longitudinal displacement during spring migration
    Current Biology 18 (3):188-190.

    N. Chernetsov, D. Kishkinev, S. Gashkov, V. Kosarev, C.V. Bolshakov (2008)
    Migratory programme of juvenile pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, from Siberia implies a detour around Central Asia
    Animal Behaviour 75 (2):539-545.

    Biography:

  • 2017-present: Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow, Bangor University, UK
  • 2016-2017: Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Bangor University, UK
  • 2014-2016: Postdoctoral Research Assistant, Queen's University Belfast, UK
  • 2012-2014: Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship (NSERC), University of Guelph, Canada
  • 2011-2012: Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Oldenburg, Germany
  • 2006-2011: PhD (Biology), University of Oldenburg, Germany
  • 2003-2005: MSc (Biology), St Petersburg State University, Russia
  • 1998-2003: Diploma (Teacher of Biology/Chemistry), Ulyanovsk State Pedagogical University, Russia

    Funding:

  • 2017-2020: Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship. Project title: The disturbing effect of electromagnetic fields on the avian magnetic compass sense.
  • 2017-2019: Russian Scientific Foundation Research Grant (PI together with 6 other participants). Project title: Sensory systems for short and long distance navigation in birds.
  • 2012-2014: Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship (NSERC, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada). Project title: Testing the magnetic and olfactory map hypotheses explaining navigational abilities in songbirds using translocation and automated radio-telemetry (see results in Kishkinev et al. 2016).
  • 2006-2011: Various stipends to fund PhD study provided by Volkswagen Foundation (2011), International Graduate School for Neurosensory Science and Systems (2007-2010, German Research Foundation, DFG, & University of Oldenburg), and German Service for Academic Exchange (DAAD, 2006-2007). PhD project: Long-distance navigation and magnetosensory mechanisms in migratory songbirds.

  • Copyright BANG - Bangor Animal Navigation Group, Design: Dr. I. Schiffner